Super Pest Control 

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Ants

Carpenter Ants


Pest Stats
Color

Usually red, black or a combination

Legs

6

Shape

Segmented; oval

Size

5/8"

Antennae

Yes

Region

Throughout U.S., most common in the North


Habitat

Carpenter ants build their nests outdoors in various wood sources, including tree stumps, firewood or landscaping. They need a constant water source to survive. Carpenter ants will enter the house through wet, damaged wood.


Carpenter ants get their name because they excavate wood in order to build their nests. Their excavation results in smooth tunnels inside the wood. These are large ants ranging in size from one-quarter inch for a worker ant to up to three-quarters inch for a queen.
Habits

All species of carpenter ants mainly attack wood that is or has been wet and damaged by mold. Even though these black carpenter ants first invade wet, decayed wood, they may soon begin building paths through dry, undamaged wood. They usually come into buildings through cracks around doors, windows, or through holes for wires. They will also crawl along overhead wires, shrubs, or tree limbs that touch the building far above the ground.


Threats

Carpenter ants damage wood through their nest building. If they gain entry to a structure, they pose a property threat.

If you notice black carpenter ants, contact a professional immediately to discuss a proper course of ant control.


Carpenter Ant Prevention

Carpenter ants require a water source. To prevent black carpenter ants in the house, eliminate sources of moisture or standing water. Keep tree branches and other plants cut back from the house. Sometimes pests use these branches to get into your home. Make sure that there are no cracks or little openings around the bottom of your house. Sometimes pests use these to get into your home. Make sure that firewood and building materials are not stored next to your home. Carpenter ants like to build nests in stacks of wood.

                  Pavement Ants


Although these ants can live inside, they get their name because they make their nests in or under cracks in pavement. They are typically found in the eastern half of the United States, California and Washington. Pavement ant colonies average 3,000 to 4,000 members and have several queens


Size: 1/8"
  • Shape: Segmented, oval
  • Color: Dark brown to black
  • Legs: 6
  • Wings: Varies
  • Antenna: Yes
  • Common Name: Pavement ant
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Hymenoptera
  • Family: Formicidae
  • Species: Tetramorium caespitum

  • Diet:


    These ants will eat almost anything, including insects, grease, seeds, honeydew, honey, bread, meats, nuts and cheese.


    Habitat:

    This ant gets its name because it most commonly nests in soil next to and beneath slabs, sidewalks, patios, and driveways. Indoors, pavement ants nest under a building’s foundation and within hollow foundation walls.


    Impact:

    Pavement ants do not pose a health threat, but they can contaminate food by leaving waste behind.


    Prevention:
    • Eliminate standing water. Pests, such as ants, mosquitoes and termites, are attracted to moisture.
    • Keep tree branches and other plants cut back from the house. Sometimes pests use these branches to get into your home.
    • Make sure that there are no cracks or little openings around the bottom of your house. Sometimes pests use these to get into your home.
    • Make sure that firewood and building materials are not stored next to your home. Pests like to build nests in stacks of wood.

                 Odorous House Ant


    Odorous House Ants

    This ant gets its name from the strong, rotten coconut-like smells it gives off when crushed and the fact that they commonly nest in or around houses. Native to the United States, these ants are very social, living in colonies of up to 100,000 members.

    • Size: 1/16" to 1/8"
    • Shape: Segmented, oval
    • Color: Brown or black
    • Legs: 6
    • Wings: Varies
    • Antenna: Yes
    • Common Name: Odorous house ant
    • Kingdom: Animalia
    • Phylum: Arthropoda
    • Class: Insecta
    • Order: Hymenoptera
    • Family: Formicidae
    • Species: Tapinoma sessile

      Diet:

      Odorous house ants like to eat dead insects and sugary sweets, especially melon.



      Habitat:

      Typically living for several years, these ants commonly make their homes in exposed soil, under stones, logs, mulch, debris and other items. They will also nest in wall and floor cracks.



      Impact:

      Odorous house ants do not pose a health threat, but they can contaminate food by leaving waste behind. 



      Prevention:
      • Avoid using other individuals' combs, hats, towels, etc.
      • Eliminate standing water. Pests, such as ants, mosquitoes and termites, are attracted to moisture.
      • Keep tree branches and other plants cut back from the house. Sometimes pests use these branches to get into your home.
      • Make sure that there are no cracks or little openings around the bottom of your house. Sometimes pests use these to get into your home.
      • Make sure that firewood and building materials are not stored next to your home. Pests like to build nests in stacks of wood.

       Facts
      There are more than 12,000 species of ants all over the world.
    • An ant can lift 20 times its own body weight. If a second grader was as strong as an ant, she would be able to pick up a car!
    • Some queen ants can live for many years and have millions of babies!
    • Ants don’t have ears. Ants "hear" by feeling vibrations in the ground through their feet.
    • When ants fight, it is usually to the death!
    • When foraging, ants leave a pheromone trail so that they know where they’ve been.
    • Queen ants have wings, which they shed when they start a new nest.
    • Ants don’t have lungs. Oxygen enters through tiny holes all over the body and carbon dioxide leaves through the same holes.
    • When the queen of the colony dies, the colony can only survive a few months. Queens are rarely replaced and the workers are not able to reproduce.
    • Although ants are frustrating when they get into your home or when you’re having a picnic, ants do help the environment. They are social insects, which means they live in large colonies or groups. Depending on the species, ant colonies can consist of millions of ants.

      There are three kinds of ants in a colony: The queen, the female workers, and males. The queen and the males have wings, while the workers don’t have wings. The queen is the only ant that can lay eggs. The male ant’s job is to mate with future queen ants and they do not live very long afterwards. Once the queen grows to adulthood, she spends the rest of her life laying eggs! Depending on the species, a colony may have one queen or many queens.

      Ant colonies also have soldier ants that protect the queen, defend the colony, gather or kill food, and attack enemy colonies in search for food and nesting space. If they defeat another ant colony, they take away eggs of the defeated ant colony. When the eggs hatch, the new ants become the "slave" ants for the colony. Some jobs of the colony include taking care of the eggs and babies, gathering food for the colony and building the anthills or mounds